Looking For A Non-Medical, Drug-Free, Whole Person Strategy To Get Your Child Or Yourself Back On Track?

Looking For A Non-Medical, Drug-Free, Whole Person Strategy To Get Your Child Or Yourself Back On Track?

FACT #1:  Adults and children with ADHD may experience symptoms of ANXIETY and DEPRESSION at home, work and in social situations including:

  • ADHD symptoms such as difficulty paying attention, disorganized, struggle to initiate and complete projects, doesn’t seem to listen, frequently late, forgetful and lose things, feel restless or impatient and interrupts conversations or intrudes on others.
  • Sometimes ANXIETY is mixed with ADHD because attention issues gives a person a lot to worry about like losing track of time or missing part of a conversation. For children anxiety and ADHD symptoms show up as trouble falling asleep or afraid to be alone anywhere in the house, having no friends, avoiding sports or other group activities, easily distracted, daydreaming and problems with organization.
  • Statistics show that DEPRESSION is nearly three times more prevalent among adults with ADHD. Both disorders bring mood problems, forgetfulness, an inability to focus, and lack of motivation.

FACT #1:  Adults and children with ADHD may experience symptoms of ANXIETY and DEPRESSION at home, work and in social situations including:

  • ADHD symptoms such as difficulty paying attention, disorganized, struggle to initiate and complete projects, doesn’t seem to listen, frequently late, forgetful and lose things, feel restless or impatient and interrupts conversations or intrudes on others.
  • Sometimes ANXIETY is mixed with ADHD because attention issues gives a person a lot to worry about like losing track of time or missing part of a conversation. For children anxiety and ADHD symptoms show up as trouble falling asleep or afraid to be alone anywhere in the house, having no friends, avoiding sports or other group activities, easily distracted, daydreaming and problems with organization.
  • Statistics show that DEPRESSION is nearly three times more prevalent among adults with ADHD. Both disorders bring mood problems, forgetfulness, an inability to focus, and lack of motivation.

FACT #1:  Adults and children with ADHD may experience symptoms of ANXIETY and DEPRESSION at home, work and in social situations including:

  • ADHD symptoms such as difficulty paying attention, disorganized, struggle to initiate and complete projects, doesn’t seem to listen, frequently late, forgetful and lose things, feel restless or impatient and interrupts conversations or intrudes on others.
  • Sometimes ANXIETY is mixed with ADHD because attention issues gives a person a lot to worry about like losing track of time or missing part of a conversation. For children anxiety and ADHD symptoms show up as trouble falling asleep or afraid to be alone anywhere in the house, having no friends, avoiding sports or other group activities, easily distracted, daydreaming and problems with organization.
  • Statistics show that DEPRESSION is nearly three times more prevalent among adults with ADHD. Both disorders bring mood problems, forgetfulness, an inability to focus, and lack of motivation.

   FACT #2:  ADHD is not just a childhood disorder.

  • ADHD starts in childhood, continues throughout the teen years and into adulthood. It is estimated that nearly 10.5 million US adults are affected by ADHD. Based on the National Comorbidity Survey Replication of 3,199 adults ages 18-44 conducted from 2001-2003).

FACT #3: ADHD is a medically recognized disorder that can be managed. 

  • Students with ADHD may quality for extra support to help with issues such as organizational skills, incomplete work, or forgetting to turn in work.  There are two federal civil rights laws that protect the educational rights of children with ADHD and other disabilities: Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or through a Individualized Education Program (IEP) as part of the Individuals with Disability Education Act (IDEA).
  • All colleges receiving federal funds must provide “reasonable accommodations” for students with disabilities including ADHD. (For a definition of disability, see your school’s disability support program under ADA).
  • Work accommodations for individuals with ADHD are recognized by the US government and are covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  Individuals with ADD/ADHD may be entitled to certain accommodations based on their needs and disability. (For a definition of disability, see ADHD Job Rights and Accommodations under ADA).

FACT #4:  No one written diagnostic test or tool can specifically identity ADHD.  However, brainwave training uses a qEEG or electroencephalogram which identifies parts of the brain thought to be involved with ADHD.

  • Many ADHD symptoms may be related to dysregulation in the part of the brain called the prefrontal cortex.
  • If the areas of the prefrontal cortex are impaired, a person with dysregulation or brainwave slowing may have symptoms such as inattention, distraction, impulsivity, restless or hyperactive behavior.

FACT #5:  ADHD is not a character flaw and it is not about intelligence or motivation. 

  • Managing our attention, emotions and social skills is challenging for everyone and especially when it is hard to pay attention, stay organized or control impulses.
  • Research reports that ADHD is caused by deficits in executive function which is the brain’s ability to manage actions and thoughts. Executive function involves self-regulation skills such as monitoring or inhibiting behavior and speech, managing attention and maintaining effort despite interest, organizing information from the senses and using it to control and express appropriate behaviors, emotions, and moods.
  • The frontal lobes within the brain act as the “brain manager” much like a store manager who coordinates the actions of other employees or key players. When the manager drifts off task, the store or the brain runs less efficiently.  When the manager is on the job, everything runs more smoothly. Because individuals with ADHD symptoms typically have underactive frontal lobes, the executive functioning is impaired.

FACT #6:  Over 50% of children with ADHD symptoms may continue to have ADHD symptoms as adults but the symptoms may look different.

  • Hyperactive symptoms like running or climbing may appear as an inner feeling of restlessness or impatience for an adult.
  • Inattentive or hyperactive/impulsive symptoms must be noted before age 12 for an adult diagnosis.
  • Have at least five inattentive and/or five hyperactive/impulsive symptoms that negatively impacts home, social, academic or occupational settings.
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