Resources

Research:

Please review the following links for six rigorous scientific studies that provide solid evidence of the effectiveness and power of NF for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD):

Arns, M., de Ridder, S., Strehl, U., Breteler, M., & Coenen, A. (2009). Efficacy of neurofeedback treatment in ADHD: The effects on inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity: A meta-analysis. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, 40(3), 180-189.  doi:10.1177/155005940904000311   http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/155005940904000311

Coben, R., Wright, E. K., Decker, S. L., & Morgan, T. (2015). The impact of coherence neurofeedback on reading delays in learning disabled children: A Randomized controlled study. NeuroRegulation, 2(4), 168-178. doi:10.15540/nr.2.4.168 www.neuroregulation.org/article/view/15893

Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A., Geoffroy, P. A., Fond, G., Lopez, R., Bioulac, S., Philip, P. (2014). EEG neurofeedback treatments in children with ADHD: An update meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8(906), 1-7.  doi:10.3389/fnhum.2014.00906   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4230047/

Steiner, N. J., Frenette, E. C., Rene K. M., Brennan, R. T., & Perrin, E. C. (2014). In-school neurofeedback training for ADHD: Sustained improvements from a randomized control trial. Pediatrics, 133(3), 483-492. doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-2059.  http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/133/3/483

Wigton, N. L., & Krigbaum, G. (2015). Attention, executive function, behavior, and electrocortical function, significantly improved with 19-channel z-score neurofeedback in a clinical setting: A pilot study. Journal of Attention Disorders, [e-pub ahead of print].  doi:10.1177/1087054715577135  http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1087054715577135

White Paper, International Society of Neurofeedback and Research, 4/17/2013;  The Evidence-Base for Neurofeedback as a Reimbursable Healthcare Service to Treat Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder by H. Edmund Pigott, Ph.D., Lindsay De Biase, Ph.D., Eugenia Bodenhamer-Davis, Ph.D. & Richard E. Davis, M.S.  link to paper

Video:

To learn more about Neurofeedback, visit the Overview of Neurofeedback page (on the ISNR website) where you will find a short video, an introduction to the equipment and process, and definitions of Neurofeedback and Biofeedack.

Books:

A Symphony in the Brain by J. Robbins (2000): For a general overview on the history and promise of neurofeedback; EEG Biofeedback friendly.

Parenting Children with ADHD: 10 Lessons That Medicine Cannot Teach by Vincent J. Monastra (2005), PhD: Shows parents how to build a successful parenting program at home; EEG Biofeedback friendly.

The Family ADHD Solution: A Scientific Approach to Maximizing Your Child’s Attention and Minimizing Parental Stress by Mark Bertin (2011), MD; Provides explanations, behavioral solutions, mindfulness stress reduction and strategies for healthy relationships; not EEG Biofeedback friendly.

Teenagers with ADD and ADHD, A Guide for Parents and Professionals by Chris A. Zeigler Dendy (2006): Information for parents on teens with ADHD; EEG Biofeedback neutral.

Organizations:

www.chadd.org Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CH.A.D.D.):  Nationally recognized authority on Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), non-profit organization providing education, advocacy, support, and  current research advances, medications and treatments affecting individuals with ADHD; not EEG biofeedback friendly

www.isnr.org The International Society for Neurofeedback and Research (ISNR), membership organization promoting neurofeedback, posts all of the relevant research sorted according to diagnosis, promotes the self-regulation of brain activity for healthier functioning.

www.aapb.org Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB), membership organization for using biofeedback and neurofeedback.

www.bcia.org Biofeedback Certification International Alliance, international standard in biofeedback certification, neurofeedback certification, and pelvic muscle dysfunction biofeedback certification.

Parental Tips:

  • Be focused and consistent with clear goals for your child or yourself.
  • Relationships are key to your child’s behavior and compliance.
  • Spend some “special time” with your child each day, even if only for 10-15 minutes.
  • Be a good listener before you tell him or her what to think.
  • Be clear about expectations with rules or values posted in a convenient space.
  • Notice good behavior ten times more that the behaviors that you do not like.
  • Do what you say and say what you mean. Keep promises to children.
  • Expect compliance the first time and be ready to back up your words.
  • Use discipline to teach a child, not to punish or get even for bad behavior. Stay in control or take time out before you discipline.
  • Have swift and clear consequences for broken rules enforced in a neutral tone of voice and appropriate body language.
  • Give the child choices rather that dictating what they are going to eat, do or wear.
  • Support each other as parents and take time for yourself.
  • Get rid of parental guilt or embarrassment by accepting feelings of resentment or situations of public outbursts as to be expected in the moment of turmoil.

Lifestyle Changes:

  • To ensure screen time quality use parental controls to block or filter internet content.
  • Preview programs, games and apps before allowing your child to view or play with them.
  • Seek out interactive options that engage your child.
  • Have your child close by during screen time so that you can supervise his or her activities.
  • Check regularly what programs, games and apps he or she has played with during the day.
  • Play a video game or explore a new app with your child.
  • Discuss what you’re watching and educate him or her about advertising and commercials.
  • Talk to your child about possible situations without you and the behavior that you expect.
  • Set aside tech-free zones such as mealtime and one night a week.
  • Require the phone to be returned to the charger nightly outside of the bedroom
  • Set limits for screen time that does not exclude unplugged, unstructured playtime.
  • Plan outdoor time with nature, not only is exercise good for kids’ bodies, but it seems to make them more focused, which is especially beneficial for kids with ADHD.
  • Unstructured outdoor time builds confidence, promotes imagination, teaches responsibility, encourages thinking/problem solving and reduces stress/fatigue.
  • Exercise daily, keep to a schedule and eat foods that avoid caffeine and artificial ingredients.
  • Go to sleep at the same time every day daily and weekends. Sleep with a weighted blanket which applies deep pressure to the body and a sense of calmness to the mind.

Educational Strategies:

Students of all ages with ADHD may qualify for extra support to help with issues such as organizational skills, incomplete work, or forgetting to turn in work.  Check out two federal civil rights laws: Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or through an Individualized Education Program (IEP) as part of the Individuals with Disability Education Act (IDEA).

Work Accommodations:

Individuals with ADHD are recognized by the US government and are covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  (For a definition of disability, see ADHD Job Rights and Accommodations under ADA).

Please review the following links for six rigorous scientific studies that provide solid evidence of the effectiveness and power of NF for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD):

Arns, M., de Ridder, S., Strehl, U., Breteler, M., & Coenen, A. (2009). Efficacy of neurofeedback treatment in ADHD: The effects on inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity: A meta-analysis. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, 40(3), 180-189.  doi:10.1177/155005940904000311   https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/155005940904000311

Coben, R., Wright, E. K., Decker, S. L., & Morgan, T. (2015). The impact of coherence neurofeedback on reading delays in learning disabled children: A Randomized controlled study. NeuroRegulation, 2(4), 168-178. doi:10.15540/nr.2.4.168 https://www.neuroregulation.org/article/view/15893

Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A., Geoffroy, P. A., Fond, G., Lopez, R., Bioulac, S., Philip, P. (2014). EEG neurofeedback treatments in children with ADHD: An update meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8(906), 1-7.  doi:10.3389/fnhum.2014.00906   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4230047/

Steiner, N. J., Frenette, E. C., Rene K. M., Brennan, R. T., & Perrin, E. C. (2014). In-school neurofeedback training for ADHD: Sustained improvements from a randomized control trial. Pediatrics, 133(3), 483-492. doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-2059.  https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/133/3/483

Wigton, N. L., & Krigbaum, G. (2015). Attention, executive function, behavior, and electrocortical function, significantly improved with 19-channel z-score neurofeedback in a clinical setting: A pilot study. Journal of Attention Disorders, [e-pub ahead of print].  doi:10.1177/1087054715577135  https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1087054715577135

White Paper, International Society of Neurofeedback and Research, 4/17/2013;  The Evidence-Base for Neurofeedback as a Reimbursable Healthcare Service to Treat Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder by H. Edmund Pigott, Ph.D., Lindsay De Biase, Ph.D., Eugenia Bodenhamer-Davis, Ph.D. & Richard E. Davis, M.S.  link to paper

To learn more about Neurofeedback, visit the Overview of Neurofeedback page (on the ISNR website) where you will find a short video, an introduction to the equipment and process, and definitions of Neurofeedback and Biofeedack.

A Symphony in the Brain by J. Robbins (2000): For a general overview on the history and promise of neurofeedback; EEG Biofeedback friendly.

Parenting Children with ADHD: 10 Lessons That Medicine Cannot Teach by Vincent J. Monastra (2005), PhD: Shows parents how to build a successful parenting program at home; EEG Biofeedback friendly.

The Family ADHD Solution: A Scientific Approach to Maximizing Your Child’s Attention and Minimizing Parental Stress by Mark Bertin (2011), MD; Provides explanations, behavioral solutions, mindfulness stress reduction and strategies for healthy relationships; not EEG Biofeedback friendly.

Teenagers with ADD and ADHD, A Guide for Parents and Professionals by Chris A. Zeigler Dendy (2006): Information for parents on teens with ADHD; EEG Biofeedback neutral.

www.chadd.org Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CH.A.D.D.): Nationally recognized authority on Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), non-profit organization providing education, advocacy, support, and  current research advances, medications and treatments affecting individuals with ADHD; not EEG biofeedback friendly

www.isnr.org The International Society for Neurofeedback and Research (ISNR), membership organization promoting neurofeedback, posts all of the relevant research sorted according to diagnosis, promotes the self-regulation of brain activity for healthier functioning.

www.aapb.org Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB), membership organization for using biofeedback and neurofeedback.

www.bcia.org Biofeedback Certification International Alliance, international standard in biofeedback certification, neurofeedback certification, and pelvic muscle dysfunction biofeedback certification.

  • Be focused and consistent with clear goals for your child or yourself.
  • Relationships are key to your child’s behavior and compliance.
  • Spend some “special time” with your child each day, even if only for 10-15 minutes.
  • Be a good listener before you tell him or her what to think.
  • Be clear about expectations with rules or values posted in a convenient space.
  • Notice good behavior ten times more that the behaviors that you do not like.
  • Do what you say and say what you mean. Keep promises to children.
  • Expect compliance the first time and be ready to back up your words.
  • Use discipline to teach a child, not to punish or get even for bad behavior. Stay in control or take time out before you discipline.
  • Have swift and clear consequences for broken rules enforced in a neutral tone of voice and appropriate body language.
  • Give the child choices rather that dictating what they are going to eat, do or wear.
  • Support each other as parents and take time for yourself.
  • Get rid of parental guilt or embarrassment by accepting feelings of resentment or situations of public outbursts as to be expected in the moment of turmoil.
  • To ensure screen time quality use parental controls to block or filter internet content.
  • Preview programs, games and apps before allowing your child to view or play with them.
  • Seek out interactive options that engage your child.
  • Have your child close by during screen time so that you can supervise his or her activities.
  • Check regularly what programs, games and apps he or she has played with during the day.
  • Play a video game or explore a new app with your child.
  • Discuss what you’re watching and educate him or her about advertising and commercials.
  • Talk to your child about possible situations without you and the behavior that you expect.
  • Set aside tech-free zones such as mealtime and one night a week.
  • Require the phone to be returned to the charger nightly outside of the bedroom
  • Set limits for screen time that does not exclude unplugged, unstructured playtime.
  • Plan outdoor time with nature, not only is exercise good for kids’ bodies, but it seems to make them more focused, which is especially beneficial for kids with ADHD.
  • Unstructured outdoor time builds confidence, promotes imagination, teaches responsibility, encourages thinking/problem solving and reduces stress/fatigue.
  • Exercise daily, keep to a schedule and eat foods that avoid caffeine and artificial ingredients.
  • Go to sleep at the same time every day daily and weekends. Sleep with a weighted blanket which applies deep pressure to the body and a sense of calmness to the mind.

Students of all ages with ADHD may qualify for extra support to help with issues such as organizational skills, incomplete work, or forgetting to turn in work. Check out two federal civil rights laws: Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or through an Individualized Education Program (IEP) as part of the Individuals with Disability Education Act (IDEA).

Individuals with ADHD are recognized by the US government and are covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (For a definition of disability, see ADHD Job Rights and Accommodations under ADA).

Please review the following links for six rigorous scientific studies that provide solid evidence of the effectiveness and power of NF for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD):

Arns, M., de Ridder, S., Strehl, U., Breteler, M., & Coenen, A. (2009). Efficacy of neurofeedback treatment in ADHD: The effects on inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity: A meta-analysis. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, 40(3), 180-189.  doi:10.1177/155005940904000311   https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/155005940904000311

Coben, R., Wright, E. K., Decker, S. L., & Morgan, T. (2015). The impact of coherence neurofeedback on reading delays in learning disabled children: A Randomized controlled study. NeuroRegulation, 2(4), 168-178. doi:10.15540/nr.2.4.168 https://www.neuroregulation.org/article/view/15893

Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A., Geoffroy, P. A., Fond, G., Lopez, R., Bioulac, S., Philip, P. (2014). EEG neurofeedback treatments in children with ADHD: An update meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8(906), 1-7.  doi:10.3389/fnhum.2014.00906   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4230047/

Steiner, N. J., Frenette, E. C., Rene K. M., Brennan, R. T., & Perrin, E. C. (2014). In-school neurofeedback training for ADHD: Sustained improvements from a randomized control trial. Pediatrics, 133(3), 483-492. doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-2059.  https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/133/3/483

Wigton, N. L., & Krigbaum, G. (2015). Attention, executive function, behavior, and electrocortical function, significantly improved with 19-channel z-score neurofeedback in a clinical setting: A pilot study. Journal of Attention Disorders, [e-pub ahead of print].  doi:10.1177/1087054715577135  https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1087054715577135

White Paper, International Society of Neurofeedback and Research, 4/17/2013;  The Evidence-Base for Neurofeedback as a Reimbursable Healthcare Service to Treat Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder by H. Edmund Pigott, Ph.D., Lindsay De Biase, Ph.D., Eugenia Bodenhamer-Davis, Ph.D. & Richard E. Davis, M.S.  link to paper

To learn more about Neurofeedback, visit the Overview of Neurofeedback page (on the ISNR website) where you will find a short video, an introduction to the equipment and process, and definitions of Neurofeedback and Biofeedack.

A Symphony in the Brain by J. Robbins (2000): For a general overview on the history and promise of neurofeedback; EEG Biofeedback friendly.

Parenting Children with ADHD: 10 Lessons That Medicine Cannot Teach by Vincent J. Monastra (2005), PhD: Shows parents how to build a successful parenting program at home; EEG Biofeedback friendly.

The Family ADHD Solution: A Scientific Approach to Maximizing Your Child’s Attention and Minimizing Parental Stress by Mark Bertin (2011), MD; Provides explanations, behavioral solutions, mindfulness stress reduction and strategies for healthy relationships; not EEG Biofeedback friendly.

Teenagers with ADD and ADHD, A Guide for Parents and Professionals by Chris A. Zeigler Dendy (2006): Information for parents on teens with ADHD; EEG Biofeedback neutral.

www.chadd.org Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CH.A.D.D.): Nationally recognized authority on Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), non-profit organization providing education, advocacy, support, and  current research advances, medications and treatments affecting individuals with ADHD; not EEG biofeedback friendly

www.isnr.org The International Society for Neurofeedback and Research (ISNR), membership organization promoting neurofeedback, posts all of the relevant research sorted according to diagnosis, promotes the self-regulation of brain activity for healthier functioning.

www.aapb.org Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB), membership organization for using biofeedback and neurofeedback.

www.bcia.org Biofeedback Certification International Alliance, international standard in biofeedback certification, neurofeedback certification, and pelvic muscle dysfunction biofeedback certification.

  • Be focused and consistent with clear goals for your child or yourself.
  • Relationships are key to your child’s behavior and compliance.
  • Spend some “special time” with your child each day, even if only for 10-15 minutes.
  • Be a good listener before you tell him or her what to think.
  • Be clear about expectations with rules or values posted in a convenient space.
  • Notice good behavior ten times more that the behaviors that you do not like.
  • Do what you say and say what you mean. Keep promises to children.
  • Expect compliance the first time and be ready to back up your words.
  • Use discipline to teach a child, not to punish or get even for bad behavior. Stay in control or take time out before you discipline.
  • Have swift and clear consequences for broken rules enforced in a neutral tone of voice and appropriate body language.
  • Give the child choices rather that dictating what they are going to eat, do or wear.
  • Support each other as parents and take time for yourself.
  • Get rid of parental guilt or embarrassment by accepting feelings of resentment or situations of public outbursts as to be expected in the moment of turmoil.
  • To ensure screen time quality use parental controls to block or filter internet content.
  • Preview programs, games and apps before allowing your child to view or play with them.
  • Seek out interactive options that engage your child.
  • Have your child close by during screen time so that you can supervise his or her activities.
  • Check regularly what programs, games and apps he or she has played with during the day.
  • Play a video game or explore a new app with your child.
  • Discuss what you’re watching and educate him or her about advertising and commercials.
  • Talk to your child about possible situations without you and the behavior that you expect.
  • Set aside tech-free zones such as mealtime and one night a week.
  • Require the phone to be returned to the charger nightly outside of the bedroom
  • Set limits for screen time that does not exclude unplugged, unstructured playtime.
  • Plan outdoor time with nature, not only is exercise good for kids’ bodies, but it seems to make them more focused, which is especially beneficial for kids with ADHD.
  • Unstructured outdoor time builds confidence, promotes imagination, teaches responsibility, encourages thinking/problem solving and reduces stress/fatigue.
  • Exercise daily, keep to a schedule and eat foods that avoid caffeine and artificial ingredients.
  • Go to sleep at the same time every day daily and weekends. Sleep with a weighted blanket which applies deep pressure to the body and a sense of calmness to the mind.

Students of all ages with ADHD may qualify for extra support to help with issues such as organizational skills, incomplete work, or forgetting to turn in work. Check out two federal civil rights laws: Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or through an Individualized Education Program (IEP) as part of the Individuals with Disability Education Act (IDEA).

Individuals with ADHD are recognized by the US government and are covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (For a definition of disability, see ADHD Job Rights and Accommodations under ADA).

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